Breed informationThe Border Collie is renowned for its intelligence, agility, hard work and innate skills with animals for herding. The Border Collie was refined in the border country of England and Scotland, with the term 'Border Collie' being used sometime after 1900. In 1873 the first recorded sheep dog trials were held in Bala, North Wales, although it was not until 33 years later in 1906 that the first registry for Border Collies was formed - The International Sheep Dog Society (ISDS).

In the UK, there are two separate registries for Border Collies. The International Sheep Dog Society encourages breeding for herding ability, whereas the Kennel Club (UK) encourages breeding for a standardized appearance. The Kennel Club first recognised the Border Collie as a pedigree breed and produced an interim standard in 1977. In 1978 the standard was amended and it is intrinsically the same standard today.

The Border Collie breaks the adage "Jack of all trades, master of none" for it excels in perhaps more disciplines than any other breed. Outside of sheep work you can find the Border Collie excelling in; showing, obedience, agility, working trials, heelwork to music, flyball, PAT, rescue, sniffer etc. as well as simply a companion. Our aim within the Breed Council is to ensure that this continues.

HealtH

The Border Collie is fortunate to have a number of DNA tests fthat can be used to identify undesirable heriditary disease-causing genes. For those conditions where a DNA test might not be available there are also a number of clinical veterinary screening schemes that dog breeders can use to increase the probability of producing healthy puppies.

A responsible breeder will always be willing to discuss relevant health issues with you.

The following schemes, tests are currently available:

BVA/KC Hip Dysplasia Scheme

BVA/KC/ISDS Eye Scheme

DNA test - CEA/CH

DNA test - CL

DNA test - TNS

BVA/KC/ISDS Gonioscopy

The list above is not necessarily comprehensive, other available health tests can be found <here>